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  • BCS customer Lisa Harnish shares her amazing techniques and recipes for "Sgraffito in Terra Sigillata-Part 2" in today's post! Visit Lisa's website for more!

    Lisa Harnish first began working with clay in January 2002. Her initial education in ceramics began at Chandler Gilbert Community College, and continues to this day. Lisa’s sgraffito designs take their inspiration from nature, such as grass, leaves, seaweed and vines that wind their way around and across the vessel. 

    Did you get a chance to read Parts 1 & 2 of our series with Lisa? If not, you may want to read them as well, as they cover making the sig, painting it on, and decorating. Today we will go over to burnish or not to burnish, and glazing if you want, finishing up the series.

  • BCS customer Lisa Harnish shares her amazing techniques and recipes for "Sgraffito in Terra Sigillata-Part 2" in today's post! Visit Lisa's website for more!

    Lisa Harnish first began working with clay in January 2002. Her initial education in ceramics began at Chandler Gilbert Community College, and continues to this day. Lisa’s sgraffito designs take their inspiration from nature, such as grass, leaves, seaweed and vines that wind their way around and across the vessel. 

    Last week we went over making terra sigillata, coloring it, and application. Today we'll go a little more in depth on how to "sgraffito" your pots, and some of the tools Lisa uses.

    Grab your coffee and follow along with this awesome technique!

    • Cyndie | #

      Thanks for the great information! How do you create your colored terra sig? On the bottom photo, I only see white clay and not the wonderful colors your mugs show...please explain :)

      Cyndie

  • Your friends at Big Ceramic Store want to wish you a Very Happy New Year!

    Today is the first day of that new year, take time to enjoy and appreciate the little things!

    Live life to the fullest ~ Love unconditionally ~ Look for good in all things ~ Hug your family and friends often ~ Smile at a stranger ~ Let your heart see the beauty all around you ~

    Don't just reach for the stars... MAKE THIS THE YEAR YOU REACH FOR YOUR DREAMS!

     

  • Big Ceramic Store is sending you wishes for a Very Merry Christmas, and a big Thank You, for your patronage and loyalty. We hope your stockings are filled with Mayco, Dolan, Kemper and Spectrum!

    Enjoy your day, thank God for your blessings, and have a few extra cookies for me (preferably the peanut butter ones with chocolate Kisses!)

  • There are many ways to get interesting patterns in your clay.

    Look around your house, your yard, and especially your kitchen, and you will start to see all kinds of things that can make good textures. Rocks, the bottom of your shoe, the wheel of a toy truck, a meat tenderizer, a piece of driftwood. The list is infinite, but for our more experience potters, here are a few of our favorite impressions.

    Complex Patterns

    1. Bisque rods. Make a bunch of coils of clay. For example, a good size is 1" diameter and 8" long. The main problem with bigger diameters is the time it takes for the clay to dry before firing. But you can set these aside and let them dry for a good long time. While the clay is still soft, carve or press patterns into it. For example, poke the end of a needle tool in to make holes. Or press the edge of a ruler in to make lines. Cover the whole surface with your pattern. After drying, bisque fire the pieces. Now you can use these rods to make patterns in wet clay. Simply roll your rod across the clay, pressing while you roll, and you can make long, continuous patterns.
    2. Take wood dowels and apply patterns to them with hot glue. When the glue dries, the dowels can be rolled across the clay to make similar patterns.
    3. Wrap string, twine or rope around a dowel in straight or criss cross patterns. Roll over the clay.
    4. Carved Linoleum. We got this idea from a potter who used to be a printmaker. Linoleum was used for flooring before we had the vinyl floors of today. Linoleum is a mixture of linseed oil and cork. When heated, it becomes soft so you can carve into it. Then it hardens when it dries. You can get linoleum at art supply stores. At the same time, you can buy a set of carving tools. Either draw or trace a pattern on the linoleum, then carve it out with the tools. You can use very intricate designs, such as a tree with many branches and leaves. The textures transfer very nicely to the clay.

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